Job Fairs and Job Boards

 


Welcome Readers to the “THE INITIATIVE”!

Workplace Communication

Saying hello or smiling is a good way to start communicating in the workplace. The ability to communicate effectively is a vital skill, regardless of the environment, whether personal or professional. Unfortunately, some of us have not been properly trained on how to communicate effectively in the workplace. First, we should begin by truly listening to what is being said and not interrupt the speaker. Restating or rephrasing important points of what you heard reassures the speaker that you were listening and allows for clarity or correction to what was communicated.

It’s important to consider your tone when communicating in the workplace. Depending on tone, the message the speaker gives can make coworkers uncomfortable or encouraged to communicate openly. Make sure that your tone is clear and concise. The evolution of technology has increased our ability to communicate electronically through email and social media, which can be a problem when it comes to tone. In addition, body language, hand gestures, eye contact or lack thereof, etc. can also signal forms of communication.

People have preferable ways to communicate in the workplace. Consider communication preferences such as emails, phone calls, text messaging, face-to-face contact and social media. Valuing coworkers preferences when communicating enhances your effectiveness as a communicator.

There are times when we must provide feedback to co-worker and staff in the workplace. Providing feedback in the workplace can be constructive or destructive. A successful communicator provides positive instructions and helpful guidelines.

If you have to communicate in written form, check for spelling and grammatical errors. Use the Spell and Grammar Check feature and proofread all correspondence. It’s okay to ask someone to review your written correspondence before sending/submitting it.

Lastly, continue to improve your communicating skills. Monitor the responses of people that you communicate with; that’ll give you insight into the areas you need to improve.

Remember…take The Initiative!!!

Reference:  Olson, L. (2012, August 14). 10 Ways to Communicate Better at Work. Retrieved July 7, 2017 from https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/08/14/1...

 

 


Hello readers. Allow me to invite you to another wonderful article of the “THE INITIATIVE”!

Employment opportunities are on the rise. Unemployment has been declining over the past year and is reported to now be at 4.9%. There are many different reasons why the unemployment rate is low. Without getting into specifics, let’s discuss what employers are doing to assist in the decline of unemployment. Employers are advertising vacant positions on job boards, in store locations, websites, and more. More importantly, many employers are hosting and participating in career fairs. I know that many shake their heads when they hear or read the words “career fair” or they say “no one cared enough to take the time to speak to me, they just kept referring me to their website”. I’m hoping that after you read this article, you’ll have a different perspective, approach and outcome to your career fair experience. Here are 10 tips to improve your employment chances.

 (1) To attend or not to attend? It’s important to know, that NOT ALL types of employers participate in career fairs, but many industries are represented there so it is worthwhile to attend if you are job-seeking.

(2) Visit the career fair website to read about attending companies. There is also a way to learn what you can expect at the event.

(3)  Determine if any employers match your career interest. If there is one company that does, you may want to attend. Once you’ve decided to attend, pre-register as a participant if required by the website.

(4) Make a list of employers and research them. It provides you with information about the employer to discuss at the career fair.

(5) Apply for jobs in advance and have plenty of resumes for distribution at the career. While at the career fair, if you are prompted to visit a website to apply, don’t take it personally. Some employers may not be able accept hard copies of resumes because they must comply with federal regulations about how they receive, store and manage applicant data.

(6) Dress appropriately in professional attire. There are several local community organizations that assist people with acquiring professional attire if there is a need.

(7) Shake hands with employer and introduce yourself. Prepare a 20-30 second verbal promotions that positively highlight you to employers. Practice so you don’t sound robotic. The introduction should be short, personable and effective.

(8) Ask employers for business cards. This is an easy way to remember who you visited at the event.

(9) Network with fellow job seekers. Share information about job leads, companies, and recruiting strategies.

(10) Follow-up with recruiters. It’s important to contact employers after career fairs. This extra step with recruiters could potentially provide you with an edge over other job seekers.  I leave you with some final reminders. Career fairs occur year-round. October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and EmployAbility will be hosting a career fair for individuals with disabilities on October 11, 2016, at the Sheraton Hotel, 400 N. Olive St., Dallas, Texas 75201. I hope you decide to participate and apply these helpful tips to your experience. When you take these extra steps and add it to ordinary, you become extraordinary. Remember…take The Initiative!!! 

 



Reentry Services: Fort Worth
Second Chance Adult Mentoring and Transitional Services Program (SCA)

In collaboration with Family Pathfinders, the Second Chance Adult Mentoring Program (SCA) serves both men and women in Federal Halfway House (VOA) and in the Tarrant County jail-based Intensive Day Treatment (IDT) program.  

The program allows participants an opportunity to change their life for the better. Probation officers, counselors, mentors, reentry service coaches and program staff have the privilege of assisting participants in doing this. The program is designed specifically for the participant and it is our desire for them to find a new direction and make positive changes that will help them to achieve success and preventrecidivism.

The reentry team is committed to helping the participants make that happen by addressing barriers to employment, affordable housing and health care, transportation; overcome financial challenges; gain positive life skills (setting SMART goals); counseling and addresses spiritual matters.

If you are interested in volunteering and/or mentoring or just want to know more about our program, please contact Lori Key at Cornerstone Assistance Network 817-632-6000 x157. 

Tarrant County Reentry Coalition (TCRC)YOU ARE INVITED!  Each month on the 3rd Friday from 9:30 - 11:00, Cornerstone hosts the Tarrant County Reentry Coalition (TCRC) which is a group of concerned citizens and organizations that are working to help ex-offenders returning from incarceration in Tarrant County. The Coalition recently launched the Tarrant County Reentry Resource Directory, a website that provides Tarrant County resources for individuals, their families, and the professionals assisting ex-offenders to achieve successful reentry. If you would like to be on the Tarrant County Reentry Coalition mailing list, please visit the TCReentry website.

UPCOMING MEETING:
Please check the Coalition website for updates on the next meeting.
Tarrant County Jail Inmate Reintegration Program (TCJIRP)In collaboration with the Tarrant County Sheriff's Department and the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) School of Social Work, Cornerstone Assistance Networkrecently concluded the Tarrant County Inmate Reintegration Program (TCJIRP). The program was a community-based effort designed to prevent adult offender re-arrests and establish successful reintegration into the community. The program worked with eligible men and women (pre- and post-release) who were at a high risk of recidivism and who returned to Tarrant County. In 18 short months, the program saw recidivism drop from 51.4% to 22% which was half the original goal of 40%. Click here to view the final analysis report.

Contact Us Cornerstone Assistance Network 3500 Noble Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76111                                                  Phone: 817-632-6000  Fax: 817-632-6001 Email: info@canetwork.org


 

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