Braille Alphabet

What is Braille ? 

Braille is a medium which allows a non-sighted person to read text by touch, is also a method for writing tactile text. 

The Braille code is physically presented as raised dots. usually arranged in cells of up to 6 dots. This is why Braille writing devices have six main keys- each key controls a dot in the Braille cell. 

The basic code is called grade 1 Braille; it is a direct substitution of normal print letters for letters from the Braille alphabet, 

In practice, most Braille users do not employ grade 1 Braille they use grade 2. Grade 2 is a shorter form which makes reading and writing Braille much faster. 

It can take several months to learn to read and write in grade 2 code. A competent writer of Braille has a speed advantage over the person who writes in conventional text, whether hand-written or typed, since Braille is a faster recording medium than either of them. 

Writing Braille by hand is accomplished by means of a device called a slate that consists of two metal plates hinged together to permit a sheet of paper to be inserted between them. Some slates have a wooden base or guide board onto which the paper is clamped. The upper of the two metal plates, the guide plate, has cell-sized windows under each of these, in the lower plate, are six slight pits in the Braille dot pattern. A stylus is used to press the paper against the pits to form the raised dots. A person using Braille writes from right to left; when the sheet is turned over, the dots face upward and are read from left to right 

Picture of Louis BrailleLouis Braille 
Born, January 4, 1809
Died, January 6, 1852

In 1829, Louis Braille published the Method of Writing Words, Music, and Plain Song by Means of Dots, for Use by the Blind and Arranged by Them. Today, this method - Braille - is used in virtually every language as the standard form of reading and writing by people who are blind, visually impaired, or deafblind. 

To learn more about Louis Braille visit this webpage. Louis Braille Biography